Post #13

Peace negotiations regarding South Vietnam, North Vietnam and the United States had began as early as 1965, but no real progress had been made until 1972-1973. Nixon had begun withdrawing troops from Vietnam but the Easter Offensive had caused more damage and conflict. And in 1972, following negotiations with North Vietnam, he announced his massive bombing campaign, known as Linebacker II and also known as the “Christmas bombings”, which began December 18th and ended December 29th. U.S. dropped over 20,000 tons of bombs on the cities of Hanoi and Haiphong. At least 30 US airmen were killed and more than 20 went missing in action, and others were captured after ejecting over North Vietnam. The bombings were an extreme effort to get North Vietnamese to continue to negotiations with the United States about resolving the conflict. And finally, in January 1973 after the extensive bombings of North Vietnam, the Paris Peace Accords was eventually signed in an attempt to restore peace and end direct U.S. military involvement in Vietnam. Under the provisions of the Accords, U.S. forces were to be completely withdrawn. The main provision of the agreement were: 1.An in-place ceasefire between North and South Vietnamese forces began at 8:00 on January 28, 1973, 2. When the ceasefire was in effect, US  troops had sixty days to withdrawn all of their forces. Both side had to release all their war prisoners 3. South Vietnam would negotiate a political settlement which would allow South Vietnamese people to decide their own political future, and 4. Reunification of Vietnam was to be “carried out step by step through peaceful means”. (http://thevietnamwar.info/how-did-the-vietnam-war-end/)

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